March 14th, 2006

Channel One's Newest Effort to Corrupt Media Literacy

By Gary Ruskin
Commercial Alert

Channel One announced today that it will conduct a media literacy workshop at the National Association of Secondary School Principals conference on Mar. 17-19.

How can a company that forces schoolchildren to watch advertising conduct media literacy workshops? Media literacy is supposed to teach students to guard themselves against advertisers. Talk about the fox taking over the chicken coop.

Maybe the National Association of Secondary School Principals should rename itself the National Association of Principals Without Principles.

See Channel One’s release below.

Channel One to Host Media Literacy Workshop at National Association of Secondary School Principals Conference

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--March 14, 2006--Channel One, the preeminent news and public affairs content provider reaching more than seven million students in middle schools and high schools across the country, today announced it will host a special media literacy workshop at the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) conference, held March 17th - 19th, at the Reno-Sparks Convention Center in Reno, Nevada.

The NASSP brings together thousands of secondary school principals from across the U.S. to participate in workshops and engage with peers on a host of issues related to education. This year’s annual forum marks the organization’s 90th year in providing excellence in middle and high school leadership.

The Channel One-sponsored Media Literacy Workshop is designed to spark discussion around the benefits of using instructional and educational video as supplement to traditional teaching materials in the classroom. Specifically, the session will offer learnings, experience and anecdotal evidence to underscore the advantages of providing students with multimedia tools that bring to light global current events and public affairs issues. Beyond the conference, Channel One will continue to spotlight the importance of media literacy through the launch of a focused campaign at the start of the 2007 school year.

“The participants at NASSP are on the frontline of education and understand the value that comes from creating interactions that not only inform students, but get them engaged in a dialogue that extends far beyond the confines of the classroom,” said Judy L. Harris, president and CEO of Channel One. “With current affairs in particular, there is tremendous opportunity to move beyond the pages of the textbook. The most effective way to capture breaking news and global events - and deliver it in real-time - is through the creative use of broadcast and online media. When integrated into course curriculum, these media vehicles are part of a powerful arsenal of educational tools.”

Broadcasting since 1990, Peabody Award-winning Channel One News is the leading source of news and information for young people. The 12-minute news broadcasts are delivered daily. Channel One News and its award-winning Web site, ChannelOne.com, feature stories on breaking news and relevant issues that affect the world, the nation, and specifically, America’s teenagers.

About Channel One

Peabody Award-winning Channel One is the preeminent news and public affairs content provider reaching more than seven million teens in middle schools and high schools across the country, nearly 30% of teenagers in the U.S. In recent months, Channel One News has covered fast-breaking world events from regions such as Iraq, Kuwait, Afghanistan, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Jordan, Cuba, Venezuela, North Korea, Myanmar, and Qatar. Channel One News programming has been featured on leading networks and news programs, including CNN, ABC News, the WB, Nightline, and The Today Show. Visit the Webby Award-winning website ChannelOne.com to learn more.

Contacts
Sloane & Company
Lisa M. Bruno, 212-446-1873

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